Wednesday, April 23, 2014

elfogadunk:

Brienne’s new armor (x)

littlesati:

Margaery Tyrell’s wedding dress (x)

alexisneoart:

Finally stuff is coming out over the new anime! I’m so excited ;;

alexisneoart:

Finally stuff is coming out over the new anime! I’m so excited ;;

jinxamataz:

commissarcuddles:

hexane-nightmares:

Holy fuck. I never really understood how they caught birds before, I assumed they had to sneak up on them. 

How was this even caught on camera?

did that cat fucking put the thing in its mouth in midair so it could land on its feet

jinxamataz:

commissarcuddles:

hexane-nightmares:

Holy fuck. I never really understood how they caught birds before, I assumed they had to sneak up on them. 

How was this even caught on camera?

did that cat fucking put the thing in its mouth in midair so it could land on its feet

(Source: kittiezandtittiez)

warblebee:

devoureth:

A most excellent lesson in self-defense à la Agent Gracie Hart.

Friendly reminder that Miss Congeniality featured a practical self-defense lesson in the middle of a Hollywood movie while also dealing with with issues of sexual assault and victim blaming, dismantling the myth that all feminists need to look and act a certain way, featuring women of color in the pageant without it being any kind of issue, and bringing in an awesome female villain because women can be any kind of character thank you very much.

Rock on, Gracie Lou.

disabledgirlism:

This incredible woman is Claudia Gordon,

Claudia Gordon, the first Black deaf female attorney in the U.S., has been an advocate for people with disabilities since high school. It was her desire to address societal barriers faced by people with disabilities that motivated her to pursue a legal education and career. Since graduating from law school and being admitted to the Maryland Bar, Claudia has conducted numerous empowerment and legal education outreach and training to communities and organizations in both the U.S. and St. Thomas USVI.

Claudia has a longstanding association with the National Black Deaf Advocates Association (NBDA), having served since 1989, and is currently its Vice-President. She has also provided advocacy leadership at the National Association of the Deaf Law Center; the Civil Practice Clinic at the Washington College of Law, Washington, DC Public Defender Service-Mental Health Division; the Black Law Students Association; the National Black Deaf Advocates Association; and the Consumer Action Network. Currently, she is an independent consultant to the National Council on Disability (NCD).

(x) (x) (x)

fire-blood-and-dragons:

Valar Morghulis

All men must die, but we are not men.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

creepyasha:

i hope they change the actor for daario naharis every season for absolutely no reason and with no explanation given

therumpus:

sonofbaldwin:

Toni Morrison goes in.

Toni, Toni, Toni.

(Source: sensationalsherri)

unphazedcat:

boystears:

yung-ananas:

edgar-allen-hoe:

God bless white people. Home girl just starts fucking chomping here teeth.
Like what?

wtf kinda irl chain chomp

LMAO SHE STARTED EATING HER BREATHING SPACE

the only thing that matters in this video is the black girl in the back all unbothered putting on her eyeliner

(Source: realitytvgifs)

"She does not really fall in love with Knightley, as Elizabeth Bennet does with Darcy. There is not a moment in Emma when she is not already in love with him. She thinks of him constantly and is always testing her own judgments and perceptions against his.” - Peter J. Leithart

(Source: knightley-emma)

fuckyeahfeminists:

Ummmm…so Brown University found a student responsible for multiple instances of sexual assault. However, he has been not been expelled and is going to be allowed to return to campus this fall.

It isn’t enough for schools to find assailants responsible. They also need to be removed from campus.

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

superlockedinthephandom:

the-vashta-nerada:

thatcrazylittlelord:

the-vashta-nerada:

nothing feels better than winning monopoly. not love. not sex. not free pizza. nothing

I’m sorry, have you tried pizza…?

yes and it doesn’t compare to owning half the board and watching the light die from your friends eyes as you take their money and feel your friendship slowly deteriorate

i like you